Challenging Nuclear Secrecy

A discussion of hierarchies, ethics and barriers to access in nuclear archives

A Nuclear Truth Project Webinar + Report Launch

  • Monday 7 August (USA and Europe)
  • Tuesday 8 August (Australia, Aotearoa, Japan and Pacific Islands)

This webinar will launch a new report around nuclear archives from the Nuclear Truth Project. Exploring issues around privileged access and ethics, the report is informed by experiences of affected community members, researchers, and activists.

Meet the team who brought the report together, and share in a discussion around accessing nuclear truth in an age of nuclear secrecy:

MARCO DE JONG is a Pacific historian and advocate for a nuclear free and independent Pacific. Marco is the lead author of the Challenging Nuclear Secrecy report. Marco lives and works in Tāmaki Makaurau, Aotearoa New Zealand.

NIC MACLELLAN is a correspondent for Islands Business magazine (Fiji) and a contributor to Pacnews, Inside Story and others. His book Grappling with the Bomb was shortlisted for the EPAA Scholarly Book of the Year in 2019. Nic has reported extensively about nuclear colonialism and resistance in the Pacific islands. Nic lives in Naarm/Melbourne Australia.

CARLA CANTAGALLO 
is a reference librarian at the at University of Kentucky with a Master of Science in Library Science. She has served as the Head of Reference, the Distance Learning Librarian and Copyright Specialist. Carla lives in Kentucky, USA.

PAM KINGFISHER AND DIMITY HAWKINS are the Co-Coordinators of the Nuclear Truth Project. Pam Kingfisher is a Cherokee woman and daughter of plutonium who lives and works from her tribal lands in Oklahoma, USA. Dimity Hawkins is an activist and researcher with links to the Pacific now living as a settler on the unceded lands of the Kulin Nations in Naarm, Australia.

This is an Zoom Webinar. Once you’re registered a link will be sent to you on how to access.

DNA Repair. 2017. 16 x 20 in. Acrylic on Watercolor Paper. Mallery Quetawki (Zuni Pueblo). artist site | instagram

​DNA has the ability to repair itself through complex mechanisms and pathways when damage occurs. Its intricacy of repair can be compared to the creation of beaded items in Native Culture. Designs are thought out ahead and require skill and patience to be able to bead such intricate pieces. When a beaded necklace comes undone, the stones/beads are restrung by using what is already there. The design used is from the Crow Nation. The use of the flower design symbolizes the idea of regrowth.

We would like to acknowledge the support of Ms. Quetawki’s images by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, the University of New Mexico NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy.

We would like to acknowledge the support of Ms. Quetawki’s images by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, the University of New Mexico NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy.

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